SETTING EXPECTATIONS – HOW TO SET CLEAR EMPLOYEE EXPECTATIONS – PART 1

This resource is a continuation of a virtual training resource on ‘Setting Expectations’. In the previous part of the resource we dealt with, ‘What are employee expectations?’ You can access that resource here. In this part of the resource we will explore – How to set clear employee expectations.


HOW TO SET CLEAR EXPECTATIONS

In this part of the session, you will explore with the participants the actions they can take to set clear employee expectations.

Display the slide titled – LEROY’S FIRST TIME TASK.


SLIDE – LEROY’S FIRST TIME TASK


After displaying the slide, tell them that:

  • Leroy is a new manager with three team members.
  • He has never set expectations before, and he needs to set them for a new member of staff.
  • Leroy is speaking to an experienced manager for support.
  • Let’s read more about the situation.

Direct them to the part of their workbooks titled – LEROY’S FIRST TIME TASK.

The information there describes a group activity they will be doing. Allow them to read the information there individually.


WORKBOOK CONTENT – LEROY’S FIRST-TIME TASK


Use the ‘breakout rooms’ feature to split them into small groups of between three to four people per group and give them 6-minutes to do the activity.

After 6-minutes, stop them and bring everyone back to the main room. Allow each group to feedback their answers and listen to them intently.

When they finish presenting their feedback, thank them for doing the activity and tell them that:

  • Let me tell you what specifically Ola told Leroy.
  • She gave him six action points to follow in order to set clear expectations for his new team member.
  • Let me show you what they are.

Display the slide titled – SIX TIPS FOR SETTING CLEAR EXPECTATIONS.


SLIDE – SIX TIPS FOR SETTING CLEAR EXPECTATIONS


After displaying the slide, the six tips will display automatically without you needing to click or do anything.

Allow them to read the information on the slide for about 2-minutes.

Then tell them that:

  • We are going to explore these six tips a bit more and this time from your own perspective.
  • In your workbooks is a section titled – APPLYING THE SIX TIPS TO YOURSELF.

WORKBOOK CONTENT – APPLYING THE SIX TIPS TO YOURSELF


Tell them to go to that section in their workbooks and let them read it for about 3 to 5-minutes.

After that give each of them 10-minutes to do the individual activity in their workbooks.

When the time is up, stop them. Ask how they found the activity generally and listen to them.

Then tell each person to tell you their answers to one of the responses to the six tips and again listen to them without commenting or asking any questions.

When they finish speaking thank, them for doing it.

Then let them know that the last thing they are going to do is help Leroy who wants to set expectations for his new team member.

They will also help Leroy create a timetable for having 1:1 meetings for reviewing expectations and discussing other important things.

In the next part of the session (in the next post), the participants will continue to explore how to set clear expectations

Setting Expectations – What are Employee Expectations?

Display the slide titled – WHAT ARE EMPLOYEE EXPECTATIONS?

Read out the instructions on the slide for them to write their description of employee expectations in the chat window. Give them 3-minutes to do it.

As they type out their definitions in the chat window, read through them quietly so you don’t distract the participants. When the 3-minutes are up, stop and thank them for doing the activity. Then let them know you are going to read their definitions.

Read out their definitions and acknowledge each person who wrote a definition by name. You can say something like:

“Thanks, Mike, you described employee expectations as…. And Sarah you wrote that employee expectations are…. Thank you.

 After that, let them know you also have a definition and some information to share with them. Direct them to the part of their workbooks titled – WHAT ARE EMPLOYEE EXPECTATIONS?

WORKBOOK CONTENT – WHAT ARE EMPLOYEE EXPECTATIONS?

Give them 5-minutes to read the information there.

After 5-minutes, stop them and ask for any comments or questions about what they’ve just read. Listen to any questions or comments they have. If necessary, respond (appropriately) to them.

Next, tell them that together you are going to discuss, how to set clear expectations.

In the next part of the session (in the next post), the participants will explore how to set clear expectations.



Setting Expectations – Introducing the Session

INTRODUCTION

Setting expectations is necessary to help employees be clear about what is expected of them in their roles. It also equips new and existing employees to succeed. Employees who know what is expected of them tend to be more engaged, productive, and satisfied at work. That’s why it is important for managers to be able to set expectations for their team members. In this session, participants will explore what expectations are and how to set them.

DELIVERY MODE

  • Virtual

DURATION (ESTIMATED)

  • 3 hours

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After going through this session, participants will be able to:

  • describe what employee expectations are
  • set clear employee expectations
  • communicate employee expectations effectively

WORKBOOK

  • Yes

PREPARATION

  • None

PREREQUISITES

  • None

INTRODUCE THE SESSION

Introduce the session by sharing the learning objectives with them. Display the slide titled – LEARNING OBJECTIVES.

After displaying the slide, tell them that:

  • During this session, we will explore setting expectations.
  • We will start by looking at what employee expectations are.
  • Then we will discuss some actions we can take to set clear employee expectations.
  • Finally, we will look at what is involved in communicating employee expectations effectively.

After the introduction, move on to the first part of the session to discuss what employee expectations are.

In the next part of the session (in the next post), the participants will explore what expectations are.

Training Activities from Emotional Intelligence 2.0 by Travis Bradberry & Jean Greaves

The book I am currently learning from is Emotional Intelligence 2.0 by Travis Bradberry and Jean Greaves. Written in 2009, this book is a great introduction to emotional intelligence. In fact, it does much more than that. The book describes what emotional intelligence is and what it looks like, identifies the four components or behaviours of emotional intelligence, and outlines actions we can take to demonstrate each of the behaviours. This book will make you a more emotionally intelligent person.

If you purchase a new copy of the book, you will also have access to an online assessment that will help you to assess your own emotional intelligence. After doing the assessment the book then provides a plan for you to identify where you are strong and areas where you may need to develop and how to do so.

For the purpose of developing virtual training activities and courses for management and leadership training, below are the key learning points I identified from the book (I have phrased them as questions).

Key Learning Points

  • What is emotional intelligence?
  • What are the four core components or behaviours of emotional intelligence?
  • What is self-awareness?
  • What does self-awareness look like?
  • How do I demonstrate self-awareness?
  • What is self-management?
  • What does self-management look like?
  • How do I demonstrate self-Management?
  • What is social awareness?
  • What does social awareness look like?
  • How do I demonstrate social awareness?
  • What is relationship management?
  • What does relationship management look like?
  • How do I demonstrate relationship management?

I will convert these key learning points into learning objectives for the purpose of designing the training activities and courses.

SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS

This post is a continuation of the virtual training resource on Social Awareness for Emotional Intelligence which can be used as part of a management development session on emotional intelligence for first-line managers. You can read about the previous part of the session on what social awareness looks like here.

REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS

Now the participants will reflect on their own social awareness by thinking about fourteen actions, including the six previously discussed. They will then decide each action is:

  • Not important for them
  • One they already do
  • An action they should start doing or do more off

They will identify three actions that they need to start doing or do more off which they will discuss with the whole group.

Direct them to the part of their workbooks titled – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS. Tell them to read the first two paragraphs of the information and check that they understand what they will be doing.

WORKBOOK – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS

Give them 10-minutes for the activity.

When the time is up, stop them and get everyone’s attention.

Then ask each participant to talk about the three actions they chose and why they chose those actions.

Make sure you listen to them. You don’t need to make any comments or ask any questions.

When they finish, thank them for doing the activity and then ask them for any comments and/or questions. Listen to any they have and respond only if necessary. Then move on to the final part of the session.

The next post will conclude this training session.

SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – SOCIAL AWARENESS IN ACTION

This post is a continuation of the virtual training resource on Social Awareness for Emotional Intelligence which can be used as part of a management development session on emotional intelligence for first-line managers. You can read about the previous part of the session on what social awareness looks like here.

SOCIAL AWARENESS IN ACTION

In this part of the session, the participants will do an activity that will require them to think about how to use social awareness in a situation. They will read and discuss a scenario and then identify what the person in the scenario can do differently to act in a more social aware way.

Tell them that:

  • We’ve just looked at six actions that can help us improve our self-awareness.
  • Now we want to help someone called Jayden to be more social aware.

Direct them to the part of their workbooks titled – JAYDEN’S MESSAGE.

WORKBOOK – JAYDEN’S MESSAGE

First, let each person read the information to understand what the task is. Then put them into small groups using the ‘breakout room’ feature to complete the task.

Give them 7-minutes to do the task.

After 7-minutes stop them and bring everyone back to the main room.

Appreciate them for doing the activity and then tell them that:

  • I am going to be acting as Jayden listening to your advice.
  • Please, advise me on what I can do differently to be more social aware.
  • What I want to know is, what I may have done wrong when passing on the message and what I can do better or differently if I have to deliver the message again.

Allow each group to give you their advice and as they give you the advice, write it down.

After they finish, summarise back to them the advice they gave you.

Then, thank them for their advice.

Next, let them know that you want them to reflect on their own social awareness.

Move on to the next part of the session titled – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS.

The next post will deal with the part of the session where the participants reflect on their own social awareness.

SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – ACTIONS FOR SOCIAL AWARENESS

This post is a continuation of the virtual training resource on Social Awareness for Emotional Intelligence which can be used as part of a management development session on emotional intelligence for first-line managers. You can read about the previous part of the session on what social awareness looks like here.

Actions for Social Awareness

In this part of the session, you will share with the participants six simple actions they can take to improve their social awareness. They will also have the opportunity to observe some demonstrations that will allow them to discuss the absence and presence of social awareness during conversations.

Tell them that:

  • So far, we’ve reviewed what social awareness is.
  • We have also explored what social awareness looks like.
  • Now, we want to discuss some simple actions we can take to improve our social awareness.

Display the slide titled – SIX ACTIONS FOR SOCIAL AWARENESS.

After the slide displays, information will appear on it automatically. Just read out the six actions onscreen without going into detail on any of them.

Then direct them to the section in their workbooks titled – SIX ACTIONS FOR SOCIAL AWARENESS.

WORKBOOK – SIX ACTIONS FOR SOCIAL AWARENESS

Tell them to read the information there for 5-minutes.

After their reading time is up, ask them for any questions and/or comments about the six actions.

Listen to any they have and respond appropriately.

Then move on to the next part of the session titled – SOCIAL AWARENESS IN ACTION.

The next post will deal with the part of the session which focuses on social awareness in action.

SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – WHAT DOES SOCIAL AWARENESS LOOK LIKE?

This post is a continuation of the virtual training resource on Social Awareness for Emotional Intelligence which can be used as part of a management development session on emotional intelligence for first-line managers. You can read about the previous part of the session here.

In this part of the session, you will explore what social awareness looks like (and what it does not look like). To do this the participants will do an activity where they think about a person whom they believe has social skills and what that person does.

Then they will read some information about two people with a good level of social awareness.

Tell them that:

  • We’ve just reviewed what social awareness is, but we also want to discuss what social awareness looks like in practice.
  • I’m sure you all know people who have good social skills. People that make you feel comfortable in their presence and at the same time understand and connect to you.
  • I’m going to put you into small groups to think about such people and write down what they do that shows they have great social skills.
  • There is some information in your workbooks for this activity. It’s the part of your workbook titled – WHAT DOES THAT “SOCIALLY AWARE” PERSON DO?

WORKBOOK – WHAT DOES THAT ‘SOCIALLY AWARE’ PERSON DO?

Use the ‘breakout rooms’ feature to put them into small groups. No group should have more than four people. Give them 7-minutes for the activity.

When their time is up, stop them and bring everyone back to the main room.

Allow each group’s spokesperson to give their feedback and you should note down what they say.

When they finish presenting their feedback from the activity, type out a concise summary of what they said in the chat window and allow them to quickly read it in about 90-seconds.

After that thank them for doing the activity and let them know that before you start looking at some actions they can all take to develop their social awareness, you want to show them what some team members said about their manager who has a good level of social awareness.

Direct them to the section in their workbooks titled – WHAT DOES SOCIAL AWARENESS LOOK LIKE?

WORKBOOK – WHAT DOES SOCIAL AWARENESS LOOK LIKE?

Give them 3-minutes to read the information there.

After they finish reading the information, ask them for any comments or questions regarding what they just read

Listen to any they have and respond appropriately.

After that let them know that you now want to share with them actions they can all take to improve their social awareness.

Move on to the next part of the session titled, Actions for social awareness.

The next post will deal with the part of the session which focuses on actions the participants can take to develop their social awareness.

TRAINING ACTIVITY – SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – WHAT IS SOCIAL AWARENESS?

In this part of the session, the participants will discuss what social awareness is by reading some information and summarising it. Direct them to the part of their workbooks titled – WHAT IS SOCIAL AWARENESS?

WORKBOOK – SOCIAL AWARENESS

Tell each of them to read the information there. That should take them no more than 5-minutes. After 5-minutes, stop them and let each person write a summary of what they read in the chat window. Give them another 3-minutes to do that.

Read through their summaries quietly so you don’t distract them and encourage them to read through each other’s summaries too. When the time is up, stop and thank them for doing the activity.

Then let them know that you now want to move on to answer the question, what does social awareness look like?

The next post will focus on the part of the session that explores what social awareness looks like in practice?

« Older Entries