Category Archives: Emotional Intelligence

SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS

This post is a continuation of the virtual training resource on Social Awareness for Emotional Intelligence which can be used as part of a management development session on emotional intelligence for first-line managers. You can read about the previous part of the session on what social awareness looks like here.

REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS

Now the participants will reflect on their own social awareness by thinking about fourteen actions, including the six previously discussed. They will then decide each action is:

  • Not important for them
  • One they already do
  • An action they should start doing or do more off

They will identify three actions that they need to start doing or do more off which they will discuss with the whole group.

Direct them to the part of their workbooks titled – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS. Tell them to read the first two paragraphs of the information and check that they understand what they will be doing.

WORKBOOK – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS

Give them 10-minutes for the activity.

When the time is up, stop them and get everyone’s attention.

Then ask each participant to talk about the three actions they chose and why they chose those actions.

Make sure you listen to them. You don’t need to make any comments or ask any questions.

When they finish, thank them for doing the activity and then ask them for any comments and/or questions. Listen to any they have and respond only if necessary. Then move on to the final part of the session.

The next post will conclude this training session.

SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – SOCIAL AWARENESS IN ACTION

This post is a continuation of the virtual training resource on Social Awareness for Emotional Intelligence which can be used as part of a management development session on emotional intelligence for first-line managers. You can read about the previous part of the session on what social awareness looks like here.

SOCIAL AWARENESS IN ACTION

In this part of the session, the participants will do an activity that will require them to think about how to use social awareness in a situation. They will read and discuss a scenario and then identify what the person in the scenario can do differently to act in a more social aware way.

Tell them that:

  • We’ve just looked at six actions that can help us improve our self-awareness.
  • Now we want to help someone called Jayden to be more social aware.

Direct them to the part of their workbooks titled – JAYDEN’S MESSAGE.

WORKBOOK – JAYDEN’S MESSAGE

First, let each person read the information to understand what the task is. Then put them into small groups using the ‘breakout room’ feature to complete the task.

Give them 7-minutes to do the task.

After 7-minutes stop them and bring everyone back to the main room.

Appreciate them for doing the activity and then tell them that:

  • I am going to be acting as Jayden listening to your advice.
  • Please, advise me on what I can do differently to be more social aware.
  • What I want to know is, what I may have done wrong when passing on the message and what I can do better or differently if I have to deliver the message again.

Allow each group to give you their advice and as they give you the advice, write it down.

After they finish, summarise back to them the advice they gave you.

Then, thank them for their advice.

Next, let them know that you want them to reflect on their own social awareness.

Move on to the next part of the session titled – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SOCIAL AWARENESS.

The next post will deal with the part of the session where the participants reflect on their own social awareness.

SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – ACTIONS FOR SOCIAL AWARENESS

This post is a continuation of the virtual training resource on Social Awareness for Emotional Intelligence which can be used as part of a management development session on emotional intelligence for first-line managers. You can read about the previous part of the session on what social awareness looks like here.

Actions for Social Awareness

In this part of the session, you will share with the participants six simple actions they can take to improve their social awareness. They will also have the opportunity to observe some demonstrations that will allow them to discuss the absence and presence of social awareness during conversations.

Tell them that:

  • So far, we’ve reviewed what social awareness is.
  • We have also explored what social awareness looks like.
  • Now, we want to discuss some simple actions we can take to improve our social awareness.

Display the slide titled – SIX ACTIONS FOR SOCIAL AWARENESS.

After the slide displays, information will appear on it automatically. Just read out the six actions onscreen without going into detail on any of them.

Then direct them to the section in their workbooks titled – SIX ACTIONS FOR SOCIAL AWARENESS.

WORKBOOK – SIX ACTIONS FOR SOCIAL AWARENESS

Tell them to read the information there for 5-minutes.

After their reading time is up, ask them for any questions and/or comments about the six actions.

Listen to any they have and respond appropriately.

Then move on to the next part of the session titled – SOCIAL AWARENESS IN ACTION.

The next post will deal with the part of the session which focuses on social awareness in action.

SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – WHAT DOES SOCIAL AWARENESS LOOK LIKE?

This post is a continuation of the virtual training resource on Social Awareness for Emotional Intelligence which can be used as part of a management development session on emotional intelligence for first-line managers. You can read about the previous part of the session here.

In this part of the session, you will explore what social awareness looks like (and what it does not look like). To do this the participants will do an activity where they think about a person whom they believe has social skills and what that person does.

Then they will read some information about two people with a good level of social awareness.

Tell them that:

  • We’ve just reviewed what social awareness is, but we also want to discuss what social awareness looks like in practice.
  • I’m sure you all know people who have good social skills. People that make you feel comfortable in their presence and at the same time understand and connect to you.
  • I’m going to put you into small groups to think about such people and write down what they do that shows they have great social skills.
  • There is some information in your workbooks for this activity. It’s the part of your workbook titled – WHAT DOES THAT “SOCIALLY AWARE” PERSON DO?

WORKBOOK – WHAT DOES THAT ‘SOCIALLY AWARE’ PERSON DO?

Use the ‘breakout rooms’ feature to put them into small groups. No group should have more than four people. Give them 7-minutes for the activity.

When their time is up, stop them and bring everyone back to the main room.

Allow each group’s spokesperson to give their feedback and you should note down what they say.

When they finish presenting their feedback from the activity, type out a concise summary of what they said in the chat window and allow them to quickly read it in about 90-seconds.

After that thank them for doing the activity and let them know that before you start looking at some actions they can all take to develop their social awareness, you want to show them what some team members said about their manager who has a good level of social awareness.

Direct them to the section in their workbooks titled – WHAT DOES SOCIAL AWARENESS LOOK LIKE?

WORKBOOK – WHAT DOES SOCIAL AWARENESS LOOK LIKE?

Give them 3-minutes to read the information there.

After they finish reading the information, ask them for any comments or questions regarding what they just read

Listen to any they have and respond appropriately.

After that let them know that you now want to share with them actions they can all take to improve their social awareness.

Move on to the next part of the session titled, Actions for social awareness.

The next post will deal with the part of the session which focuses on actions the participants can take to develop their social awareness.

TRAINING ACTIVITY – SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – WHAT IS SOCIAL AWARENESS?

In this part of the session, the participants will discuss what social awareness is by reading some information and summarising it. Direct them to the part of their workbooks titled – WHAT IS SOCIAL AWARENESS?

WORKBOOK – SOCIAL AWARENESS

Tell each of them to read the information there. That should take them no more than 5-minutes. After 5-minutes, stop them and let each person write a summary of what they read in the chat window. Give them another 3-minutes to do that.

Read through their summaries quietly so you don’t distract them and encourage them to read through each other’s summaries too. When the time is up, stop and thank them for doing the activity.

Then let them know that you now want to move on to answer the question, what does social awareness look like?

The next post will focus on the part of the session that explores what social awareness looks like in practice?

TRAINING ACTIVITY – SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – INTRODUCE THE SESSION

This is the opening part of the training session. There is a previous post that gives an overview of the session. You can read that post here.

Introduce the session by sharing the learning objective with them. Display the slide titled – LEARNING OBJECTIVES.

Then tell them that:

  • Social awareness is the third component of emotional intelligence. It is also the first and foundational component of social competence when it comes to emotional intelligence.
  • In this session, we are going to discuss what social awareness is.
  • We will also identify some actions we can take to develop our own social awareness.

Ask them for any questions and/or comments about what you just told them. Listen to any they have and respond appropriately.

Then move on to the first part of the session – what is social awareness?

In the next post (and part of the session), we will focus on helping the participants understand what social awareness is. The aim is to ensure that the participants are able to describe what social awareness is.

TRAINING ACTIVITY – SOCIAL AWARENESS FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – ABOUT THE SESSION

INTRODUCTION

Social awareness is the third component or behaviour of emotional intelligence. It is also the first and foundational component of social competence. In this session, participants will explore some actions they can take to develop their social awareness so they can become more emotionally intelligent.

DELIVERY MODE

  • Virtual

DURATION (ESTIMATED)

  • 90-minutes

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • describe what social awareness is, and
  • identify actions they can take to develop their social awareness.

WORKBOOK

  • Yes

PREPARATION

  • Read through all the resources (facilitation guide, workbook, and presentation) to understand how they all work together to deliver the session.

PREREQUISITES

Participants should know what emotional intelligence is, its four components or core behaviours, and have an understanding of self-awareness and self-management.

PARTICIPANTS GROUP SIZE

Up to 16 people

In the next post, we will introduce the session and share the learning objectives.

TRAINING SESSION – SELF-MANAGEMENT FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – REVIEW, REFLECT AND FINISH

This is a continuation of the training session on Self-Management for Emotional Intelligence. You can access the previous part of the session here.

Display the slide titled – REVIEW.

Tell them that:

  • During this session, we described what self-management is.
  • We also identified and explored six actions you can take to develop your own self-management.
  • You had the opportunity to discuss some demonstrations of what was and was not self-management behaviour.
  • We also had a reflective session that allowed you to think about your own self-management.
  • Before we close the session, you will do one final reflective activity to help you think about what you are taking away from this session to apply in real life.

Display the slide titled – START – STOP – CONTINUE.

Direct them to the part of their workbooks titled – START – STOP – CONTINUE. Give them 6-minutes to read the information there and do the reflective activity.

WORKBOOK – STOP – START – CONTINUE

When the time is up, stop them and get everyone’s attention. Thank them for taking the time to do the reflective activity. Ask each participant to share at least one thing from their reflection

Listen to them without commenting or asking any questions.

After that, thank them for their participation and close the session.

This is the end of the session.

TRAINING SESSION – SELF-MANAGEMENT FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SELF-MANAGEMENT

This is a continuation of the training session on Self-Management for Emotional Intelligence. You can access the previous part of the session here.

Tell them that:

  • I want you to think about how you can apply some of the six actions we have talked about to your own self-management.
  • We are going to do a reflective section where I make some statements and ask you questions, and you reflect on them.
  • If you want to write your answers down, there is space in your workbook in the section titled – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SELF-MANAGEMENT.

WORKBOOK – REFLECTING ON YOUR OWN SELF-MANAGEMENT

Let them know that you are ready to start the reflective session. Read out the following statements to them:

  • Think about situations that put you under pressure. Situations that make you feel anxious.
  • Write one of such situations down. Describe the situation and think about how you felt in the situation. What feelings were you aware of?
  • Next, think about those feelings. In order for the feelings not to make you respond impulsively what can you do?
  • Can you take deep breaths and count to ten so that you can regain your composure, re-focus, and think clearly?
  • Think about someone that you find difficult to engage with. It may be at work or outside of work. Maybe your conversations often lead to conflicts or arguments.
  • As you think about that person right now, what self-talk do you have about them in your head? Do you see the person in a negative light? Maybe you see them as challenging, difficult, unreasonable, or impossible.
  • What would happen if you decided to check your self-talk about the person and recognise the ‘not-so-helpful’ views you hold about them.
  • The next time you need to talk to this person what if you decide to see the conversation as a learning opportunity. An opportunity to learn something about yourself and the other person.
  • Instead of seeing it as a potentially difficult conversation or engagement. See it as an opportunity to be curious about the person. An opportunity to open your mind to learn from them, suspend any negative talk you have in your head, pay them attention, and listen.
  • Yes, they may say something that pushes your trigger buttons but remember to stay aware of your emotions and then to remain in control, do some deep breaths and count to ten.
  • Think about that challenging situation you may be dealing with right now. Maybe it’s a project or a decision you need to make. The situation may be causing you to have strong emotions such as anger or even fear.
  • Would it help to sleep on it? Give yourself an opportunity to really think about it. Write the emotions you are having about the issue and then think about why you are feeling that way.
  • It may also help to talk to someone who is not emotionally vested in the situation. Listen to their objective view and think about it.
  • The point of this reflective exercise is to help you think about how you can apply the self-management actions to day-to-day situations.
  • To help you deal with your self-talk, to help you take good deep breaths and count to 10 when necessary.
  • To help you see encounters as learning opportunities instead of negative engagements.
  • To help you sleep on things when necessary and ask for other people’s points of view.

After that, end the reflective session and be quiet for about 90-seconds without saying anything.

Then ask them for questions and / or comments. Listen to anything they have to say and respond if necessary.

Tell them that there is one other self-management action you want to tell them about, and it’s called the ‘emotion vs. reason list’.

Display the slide titled – EMOTIONS VS. REASON LIST.

Click on the slide once and read out the information on the screen.

Click on the slide again to display more information and allow them to read the information for about 10-seconds before you click on the slide a final time for them to read the last bit of information.

Then let them know that before we conclude you want to share with them information about two people whom their teams said display good levels of self-management.

Let them know that they’ve done a bit of reading, so you want to read the information out to them. It is in their workbooks.

Display the section in their workbooks titled – WHAT SELF-MANAGEMENT LOOKS LIKE.

WORKBOOK – WHAT SELF-MANAGEMENT LOOKS LIKE

Read out the information on the screen so they can all hear.

After you finish reading it, ask them for any comments and/or questions and respond appropriately.

After that move on to the final part of the session.

In the final part of the session, participants will review and reflect on what was discussed during the session.

RAINING SESSION – SELF-MANAGEMENT FOR EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – SIX ACTIONS FOR SELF-MANAGEMENT

This is a continuation of the training session on Self-Management for Emotional Intelligence. You can access the previous part of the session here.

Display the slide titled – SIX ACTIONS FOR SELF-MANAGEMENT.

After the slide displays, information will appear on the slide automatically. As the information appears, tell them that:

  • Here are six actions that can help our self-management and some of them were used by Larry. They are:
    • Take charge of your self-talk
    • See every encounter as a learning opportunity
    • Breath right
    • Count to ten
    • Speak to someone not emotionally invested
    • Sleep on it

After that direct them to the section in their workbooks titled – SIX ACTIONS FOR SELF-MANAGEMENT.

WORKBOOK – SIX ACTIONS FOR SELF-MANAGEMENT

Give them up to 5-minutes to read the information there. After they finish reading ask them for any comments and/or questions about the six actions and listen to any that they have.

Only respond if necessary.

Next, tell them that you want them to reflect on their own self-management.

In the next part of the session, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their own self-management.

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